Targeted Funding Opportunities

MSRDC continues to work on behalf of our members to build new relationships, and ultimately contracts, with new potential federal agencies. We do this by creating relationships with key representatives of federal agencies and emphasizing the value and caliber of work our member institutions possess.

Check the Status of a Previous Submission
Stay Updated About These Opportunities
Have another research idea? Contact us.

Call for Submissions: Opaque Building Envelopes

Status: Accepting Submissions

Department of Energy (DOE)
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Building Technology Office (BTO)


Objective:  The objective is to design, develop, prototype and test multiple iterations of technologies that can characterize the key energy performance-related properties of existing opaque envelopes could facilitate retrofit adoption by quantifying the benefit of retrofits and verify post-retrofit performance.  Develop novel diagnostic metrology suitable for year-round buildings testing conditions.  Investigate virtual sensing to evaluate envelope performance and establish minimum requirements.  Develop diagnostic metrology for envelope moisture performance.  Develop low computational cost, accurate methods for modeling complex heat and mass transfer flows.

 

Background: The opaque envelope—the barrier that helps maintain comfortable indoor conditions irrespective of prevailing outdoor conditions—is the single largest contributor to primary energy use in residential and commercial buildings. Residential and commercial buildings comprise 39% of total U.S. primary energy use. The opaque envelope affects 25% of building energy use, or 10% of total U.S. primary energy use. Improving the energy performance of the opaque envelope in U.S. buildings is critical to reducing total building energy use. Retrofits are crucial to realizing the energy savings potential of the opaque envelope because nearly 85% of residential and 55% of commercial buildings that exist today will still exist in 2050. Building envelope performance is also relevant to occupant comfort, productivity, health, and well-being.

 

Approach: Technologies that can characterize the existing opaque envelope—its energy performance, state of repair, dimensions, or other key properties—could help facilitate the adoption of envelope retrofits by quantifying their prospective (project-specific) value proposition, enabling the specification of appropriate retrofit interventions and verifying performance improvements following retrofits. These technologies might also be useful for building energy code compliance assessment in new construction, potentially offering rapid in-field validation of building construction and energy performance. Currently available technologies include blower door testing to measure air infiltration as well as infrared imaging to locate and estimate the extent of insulation inadequacies and air infiltration in the envelope. Novel nondestructive testing and sensing technologies; simplified, lower-cost physical testing platforms; and novel, low-computational expense data acquisition and synthesis software have the potential to significantly expand the impact and reach of envelope diagnostic technologies

 

For more information about the Department of Energy research priority, please see: https://www.energy.gov/eere/buildings/emerging-technologies

https://www.energy.gov/eere/buildings/building-envelope

Submit Your Capabilities

Call for Submissions: Thermal Energy Storage

Status: Accepting Submissions

Department of Energy (DOE)
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Concentrating Solar-thermal Power (CSP)


Objective:  The objective is to design, develop, prototype and test multiple iterations of phase change materials to advance BTO’s thermal energy storage goals.  Phase change materials (PCMs) are a class of thermal energy storage materials that absorb and release thermal energy during the process of melting and freezing. When a PCM melts, it absorbs a large amount of energy. Conversely, when a PCM freezes it releases a large amount of energy in the form of latent heat at a relatively constant temperature. These materials can thus reduce and shift the timing of heating or cooling energy demand. The primary grid benefit of thermal storage is load shifting and shedding by supplanting HVAC system operation during peak hours and using the HVAC system to recharge the storage during off-peak hours.

 

Background The Building Technologies Office (BTO) is focused on thermal storage research, development and field validation, seeking to accelerate the commercialization and utilization of next-generation energy storage technologies and sustain American global leadership in energy storage. In general, over 50% of building energy consumption can be attributed to thermal loads, making thermal energy storage a natural fit for the built environment. BTO is focusing on developing thermal energy storage technologies, including materials, equipment, and systems, for building applications. Thermal energy storage materials can increase energy savings and flexibility for shedding and shifting building loads. Future materials can further optimize utilization of storage capacity through improved temporal and spatial control of heat flows.

.

 

Approach:  Demand flexibility from a building component or technology requires control over the timing of the operation of that system and the magnitude of its electricity demand. There are no methods currently available to independently control the timing or rate of charging or discharging of opaque envelope thermal storage technologies (such as PCMs)Research to develop materials that can be added to existing thermal storage materials or technologies, or novel thermal storage materials that have inherent charge, discharge, and rate control capabilities, is critical to the potential for building envelope thermal storage technologies to provide grid services. Charge and discharge event control is most critical; being able to stop and start charging and discharging is a minimum requirement for GEB operation with thermal storage. To facilitate research on materials that enable active control capabilities for opaque envelope thermal storage, supporting research must be conducted to determine the desired or optimal active control capabilities for thermal storage. This research would consider generic thermal storage and control capabilities to determine the performance requirements for thermal storage provision of a range of potentially feasible grid services.

 

For more information about the Department of Energy research priority, please see: 

https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/solar-energy-technologies-office

https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/concentrating-solar-thermal-power

Submit Your Capabilities

Call for Submissions: Next Generation Electric Machines (NGEM)

Status: Accepting Submissions

Department of Energy (DOE)
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Advanced Manufacturing Office 
(AMO)

 

Objective: The objective is to design, develop, prototype and test multiple iterations of devices to advance AMO’s Next Generation Electric Machines (NGEM).  This effort leverages recent technology advancements in power electronics and electric motors to develop a new generation of energy efficient, high power density, high speed, integrated medium voltage (MV) drive systems for a wide variety of critical energy applications.

Background: In 2013, electricity accounted for approximately 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States and manufacturing was responsible for more than a quarter of end‐use. Electric motor‐driven systems used 68% of this total electricity for essential energy intensive industrial processes such as refrigeration, pumps, fans, compressors, materials handling, materials processing, and facility HVAC systems. NGEM technology development would help to mitigate energy consumption and move AMO’s mandate forward.

 

Approach: Improvements to industrial electric motor systems can be realized through the application of key enabling technologies, such as wide bandgap devices, advanced magnetic materials, improved insulation materials, aggressive cooling techniques, high speed bearing designs, and improved conductors or superconducting materials. The NGEM program will facilitate a step-change that enables more efficient use of electricity, as well as reduced drive system size and weight, developing lasting capabilities for motor material development and design that will reduce industry’s energy footprint and greenhouse gas emissions while supporting U.S. global competitiveness in clean energy products.

 

For more information about the Department of Energy research priority, please see: 

https://www.energy.gov/eere/amo/advanced-manufacturing-office

https://www.energy.gov/eere/amo/electric-machines

Submit Your Capabilities

Call for Submissions: Directed Energy Weapons -  Ultra-Short Pulse Laser and Atmospheric Characterization

Status: Accepting Submissions

Office of Naval Research (ONR)
Aerospace Science Research (351)

 

Objective: The objective is to design, develop, prototype and test multiple iterations of devices to advance the transition of ultra-short pulse lasers (UPSL) by enhancing precision dynamic engagement, though atmospheric compensation, material interactions, and source development.

 

Background: The 351 team supports fundamental research that advances our understanding the frontiers of physics, optics, and engineering for Directed Energy (DE) Platforms. DE applications remain constrained due to challenges in (a) design of real-time adaptive optics that can mitigate both natural (e.g., ocean spray or haze) and induced (e.g., thermal blooming, filamentation, and scintillation) atmospheric effects, (b) the Physics of Ultra Short Laser Pulses and their effects on materials, (c) Laser Source development, including but not limited to: weight and cooling, compact design, energy density, and propagation.

 

Approach: The approach of the initiative is to develop systems that improve on the performance on prediction in one of these domains; real-time adaptive optics, UPSPL material effects, laser sources. [Approach Option 1] Research often focuses on the theoretical predictions or bench top demonstrations, for the current initiative we are seeking more mature technologies with a high likelihood of transition. Applicants will form cooperative teams with a goal of initial capability demonstration within 2 years. [Approach Option 2] For the current initiative 351 seeks applications harnessing cross-disciplinary synergies to leap-frog current state technologies. Applicants should clearly state the proposed innovation and its departure from current practice.

 

 

For more information about the Department of Energy research priority, please see: 

https://www.onr.navy.mil/en/Science-Technology/Departments/Code-35/All-Programs/aerospace-science-research-351

https://www.onr.navy.mil/en/Science-Technology/Departments/Code-35/All-Programs/aerospace-science-research-351/directed-energy-weapons-cdew-and-high-energy-lasers

Submit Your Capabilities

Call for Submissions: High-Temperature Technologies for Naval Applications

Status: Accepting Submissions

Office of Naval Research (ONR)
Code 33 - 
Mission Capable, Persistent and Survivable Naval Platforms

Division 333

 

Objective: The objective is to design, develop, prototype and test multiple iterations of novel advanced high-temperature materials, power sources, and diagnostic sensors for improved performance and efficiency of naval systems.

 

Background: The 333 team supports basic and applied research fundamental research to provide sea-based power projection through persistent anytime, anywhere access. Technological advances in naval applications (directed energy, battery technologies, and computational architectures) require the concomitant develop of (a) materials capable of sustained power generation (while decrease weight and size), (b) development of advanced electrically insulating and thermally conductive materials for improved passive thermal management of high-power electronics, (c) Femtosecond laser-processed materials for increased strength, reduced weight, improved heat-transfer and drag-reduction properties, and resistance to corrosion/fouling for marine environments.

 

Approach: The approach of the initiative is to develop systems that demonstrate performance improvements in the above domains. [Approach Option 1] Funding for initial theoretical demonstration (i.e., Modeling and Simulation) of process improvements, with an option for transition to benchtop proof of concepts. Applicants may form cooperative teams with the goal of theoretical demonstration within 1 year and an option for an additional 2 years of funding for benchtop implementations. [Approach Option 2] For the current initiative 333 seeks applications harnessing cross-disciplinary synergies to leap-frog current state technologies. Applicants should clearly state the proposed innovation and its departure from current practice.

 

 

For more information about the Department of Energy research priority, please see: 

https://www.onr.navy.mil/Science-Technology/Departments/Code-33

https://www.onr.navy.mil/en/Science-Technology/Departments/Code-33/All-Programs/333-weapons-and-payloads/high-temperature-technologies

Submit Your Capabilities

Call for Submissions: Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning for Photonics, Power & Energy, Atmospherics, and Quantum Science

Status: Accepting Submissions

Office of Naval Research (ONR)
Code 33 - 
Mission Capable, Persistent and Survivable Naval Platforms

Division 333

 

Objective: The objective is to design, develop, prototype and test multiple iterations of novel (non-COTS) AI/ML applications that harness advances in these fields and apply them to photonics, power and energy, thermal management and controls, atmospherics, communication, and quantum science for improved naval capabilities.

 

Background: The 333 team supports basic and applied research fundamental research to provide sea-based power projection through persistent anytime, anywhere access. Advances in Machine learning are expected to have broad impacts in the areas of Directed energy, power and energy, thermal management, controls, atmospherics, and quantum materials. Specifically challenges/opportunities include (a) the pairing of adaptive optics and deep learning for real-time beam forming/correction for atmospheric corrections, (b) optimization of energy regulation and switching to improve energy efficiency and availability, (c) development of machine learning applications for certification of boson sampling devices to find patterns in high-dimensional data to ultimately enable sensitive quantum detectors and sensors.

 

Approach: The approach of the initiative is to develop systems that demonstrate performance improvements in the above domains. [Approach Option 1] Funding for initial theoretical demonstration (i.e., Modeling and Simulation) of process improvements, with an option for transition to benchtop proof of concepts. Applicants may form cooperative teams with the goal of theoretical demonstration within 1 year and an option for an additional 2 years of funding for benchtop implementations. [Approach Option 2] For the current initiative 333 seeks applications harnessing cross-disciplinary synergies to leap-frog current state technologies. Applicants should clearly state the proposed innovation and its departure from current practice. Ideal teams will include members with deep subject matter expertise in both an application (e.g., adaptive optics) and machine learning discipline (e.g., Convolutional Neural Networks).

 

 

For more information about the Department of Energy research priority, please see: 

https://www.onr.navy.mil/Science-Technology/Departments/Code-33

https://www.onr.navy.mil/en/Science-Technology/Departments/Code-33/All-Programs/333-weapons-and-payloads/artificial-intelligence-machine-learning

Submit Your Capabilities

Funding Opportunities in the Pipeline

By submitting your capabilities, you can work with us to secure funding and forge deeper relationships with our government partners. Our unique funding vehicle allows researchers to work directly with federal program managers to develop innovative solutions to complex problems.
Submit Your Capabilities
Check the Status of a Previous Submission
Stay Updated About These Opportunities

Office of Policy Development and Research

Department of Housing and Urban Development

OPDR serves as a research, survey, study, and analysis support system for HUD and facilitates the formation of partnerships between universities and communities so they can jointly address urban problems.
    • American Housing Survey and Choice Neighborhoods Evaluation
    • Evaluation of Programs Serving Homeless Youth
    • Accelerating Housing Recovery After a Severe Disaster

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Morgan State University

Building Technologies Office

Department of Energy

BTO develops innovative, cost-effective energy saving solutions—better products, better new homes, better ways to improve older homes, and better buildings in which we work, shop, and lead our everyday lives.
    • LED and OLED Technologies
    • Residential and Commercial Buildings

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • California State University, Northridge
    • The City College of New York
    • Delaware State University
    • Hampton University
    • Howard University
    • Prairie View A&M University
    • Texas State University
    • University of Arizona
    • University of New Mexico
    • University of Texas, El Paso

Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense

Department of Defense

JPEO for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Defense exists to manage our nation’s investments in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense equipment. Research and critical development areas include: 
    • Protect - To identify threats and hazards
    • Respond - To detect, identify and measure CBRN and characterize CBRN
    • Recover - To control hazardous waste and mitigate contamination

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Albany State University
    • The City College of New York
    • Fisk University
    • Howard University
    • NC Central University
    • Norfolk State University
    • Morgan State University
    • San Diego State University
    • Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
    • University of the District of Columbia
    • University of Texas, San Antonio

United States Army Futures Command

Department of Defense

AFC leads a continuous transformation of Army modernization in order to provide future warfighters with the concepts, capabilities and organizational structures they need to dominate a future battlefield.
    • Artificial Intelligence for Maneuver and Mobility
    • Electronic Warfare in Multi-Domain Operations
    • Transformational Synbio for Military Envrionments

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • California State University, Chico
    • California State University, Northridge
    • California State University, Sacramento
    • The City College of New York
    • Fayetteville State University
    • Howard University
    • Hunter College - CUNY
    • Lincoln University of Missouri
    • Northern Arizona University
    • North Carolina A&T State University
    • Prairie View A&M University
    • San Diego State University
    • Tennessee State University
    • Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
    • Texas State University
    • University of Arizona
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
    • University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    • University of New Mexico
    • University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    • University of Texas, El Paso
    • University of Texas, San Antonio

Federal Railroad Administration

Department of Transportation

FRA ensures the safe, efficient, and reliable movement of people and goods by rail through basic and applied research, and development of innovations and solutions.
    • Flaw and Defect Detection
    • Bridge Collision Detection
    • Human-Machine Automation

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Old Dominion University
    • University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    • California State University, Northridge
    • University of North Carolina at Charlotte
    • Howard University
    • University of New Mexico
    • New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology
    • University of Arizona
    • University of Texas, El Paso
    • Morgan State University
    • San Diego State University
    • North Carolina A&T State University
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore County

National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities

National Institutes of Health

MHHD's leads scientific research to improve minority health and reduce health disparities.
    • Plans, coordinates, reviews, and evaluates NIH minority health and health disparities research and activities
    • Conducts and supports research in minority health and health disparities
    • Promotes and supports the training of a diverse research workforce

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Fayetteville State University
    • Morgan State University
    • Texas A&M State University
Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories
Food and Drug Administration
OSEL is dedicated to promoting innovation for the development of new life saving medical devices.
    • Applied Mechanics
    • Biomedical Physics
    • Biology Chemistry and Materials Science
    • Imaging Diagnostics and Software Reliability

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Delaware State University
    • Fayetteville State University
    • Morgan State University
    • Northern Arizona University
    • San Diego State University
    • Texas A&M State University
    • University of Texas, San Antonio

Solar Energies Technologies Office

Department of Energy

SETO funds early stage research with goals of improving the affordability, performance and value of solar energy technologies on the grid.
    • Photovoltaics
    • Concentrating Solar-Thermal-Power

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • California State University, Northridge
    • Delaware State University
    • Prairie View A&M University
    • University of Arizona
    • University of Texas, El Paso

Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Department of Defense

DTRA's mission is to counter and deter weapons of mass destruction and improvised threat networks. Research and development areas:
    • Development of improved detection devices for traditional and nontraditional chemical agents​
    • Development of diagnostics for existing and emerging infectious disease threats
    • ​Improved capabilities for development of new/improved medical and material countermeasures for both pre- and post-exposure

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Albany State University
    • The City College of New York
    • Fisk University
    • Howard University
    • NC Central University
    • Norfolk State University
    • Morgan State University
    • San Diego State University
    • Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
    • University of the District of Columbia
    • University of Texas, San Antonio

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

Department of Transportation

PHMSA's mission is the research and development projects focused on providing near-term solutions to help ensure the safe, reliable, and environmentally-sound operation of the Nation's pipeline system.
    • Pipeline Testing
    • UAS Pipeline Safety

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • California State University, Northridge
    • The City College of New York
    • New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology
    • Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
    • Texas State University
    • University of Arizona
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore County
    • University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    • University of New Mexico
    • University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Maritime Administration

Department of Transportation

MA's mission is the research, development, assessment and demonstration of emerging marine technologies to improve the safety and efficiency of U.S. maritime transportation.
  • Control of Aquatic Invasive Species
  • Biofuels
  • Emissions Reduction

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • California State University, Chico
    • Howard University 
    • North Carolina A&T State University
    • Old Dominion University
    • Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi
    • University of Arizona
    • University of New Mexico
    • University of Texas, El Paso
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
National Institutes of Health
NHLBI works to:
    • Understand Human Biology
    • Reduce Human Disease
    • Develop Workforce and Resources
    • Advance Translational Research

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Delaware State University
    • Fisk University
    • Morgan State University

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease

National Institutes of Health

NIDDK research creates knowledge about and treatments for diseases that are among the most chronic, costly, and consequential for patients, their families, and the Nation.

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Fayetteville State University
    • Morgan State University
    • Texas A&M State University

National Cancer Institute

National Institutes of Health

NCI leads, conducts, and supports cancer research across the nation to advance scientific knowledge and help all people live longer, healthier lives.

Our Vetted Members and Partners:

    • Delaware State University
    • Fayetteville State University
    • Morgan State University